Boise Police Department
News Release

Michael F. Masterson
Chief of Police


Contact: Lynn Hightower
Communications Director
570-6180

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Award-Winning Author, Scholarship Winner to be featured at Idaho Inclusiveness Coalition Annual Meeting

The following is sent out as a cuortesy to the Idaho Inclusiveness Coalition by Boise Chief of Police Michael Masterson. Chief Masterson has been an active member of the IIC since he became Chief in 2005.

Boise, Jan 22, 2013 - Members of the public and media are invited to attend the annual meeting of the Idaho Inclusiveness Coalition.

The event will feature a presentation to the winner of the Idaho Human Rights 2012 Scholarship.

Following the meeting, award-winning writer, feminist and Hip Hop scholar, Dr. Tricia Rose, will be the keynote speaker at the 2013 Martin Luther King Jr. Living Legacy Celebration. Dr. Rose is well known for her groundbreaking book ‘Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America’. Considered the foundational text for the study of Hip Hop, her book has defined what is now an entire field of study.

WHAT: The 2013 IIC Annual Meeting

WHERE: BSU Student Union Building in the Barnwell Room

WHEN: Monday, January 28th, 6:00 - 7:00 p.m.

 

Black Noise : Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America

Rap recordings are discussed almost everywhere today, from schoolyards and subways to the U.S. Senate and Supreme Court. Rose thoroughly analyzes several facets of the musical genre and provides an effective antidote to the severely flawed hip-hop coverage in mainstream media. She accurately traces rap's sonic history (proving thereby that music does not require conventional melody or harmony) and gives substantial information about the innovative rhythmic manipulations made possible by the techniques of sampling. She also makes clear the connections between rap's beginnings and the political turmoils that afflicted black and Latino urban neighborhoods throughout the 1970s and 1980s. In discussing what is probably rap's most controversial aspect--lyrics supposedly advocating "cop killing"--Rose vividly delineates the social conditions that bring about such fierce responses to real-life police brutality. Finally, she examines the often neglected role of women in rap in rewarding depth. Fans, scholars, and detractors alike stand to learn a great deal by studying Rose's commendable treatise. (Aaron Cohen, Booklist