Boise Police Department
News Release

Michael F. Masterson
Chief of Police


Contact: Lynn Hightower
Communications Director
570-6180

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Aggressive Drivers Watch Out! Extra Patrols about to hit the streets.

Aggressive Drivers Watch Out! Extra Patrols about to hit the streets.

    Boise, March 31, 2010 - Boise Police are joining a statewide effort to place extra patrols on the streets looking specifically for aggressive drivers!

    Aggressive driving is defined as speeding, tailgating, running red lights or cruising through stop signs, changing lanes without warning, and failing to yield to other vehicles. These driving behaviors are poor decisions and indicators of aggressive driving.   

    "Aggressive driving is what we get the most citizen complaints about, and rightfully so. Aggressive driving behaviors are the cause of a lot of injury crashes," said Boise Motors Officer Eric Simunich.

    Boise Police are receiving a grant of more than $20,000 from the Idaho Department of Transportation Office of Highway Safety to help pay for the extra patrols that begin Thursday, April 1st and continue through Monday, April 12th. 

    "Aggressive driving, like speeding and running red lights is always a focus for law enforcement," said Officer Simunich. "But the grant allows us to put even more officers on Boise streets, and the extra education and enforcement on aggressive driving might even prevent some crashes and injuries. We hope so."

    During the aggressive driving enforcement campaign, officers will increase enforcement of speed limits and traffic laws.

    According to the ITD Office of Highway Safety:

  • Aggressive driving behaviors contribute to more than half of Idaho's traffic fatalities.
  • The economic cost of crashes involving aggressive driving was close to $1.5 billion in 2008, which represents nearly half of the total costs of all crashes in Idaho, according to ITD. 
  • On average, more than 100 people die as a result of aggressive driving crashes each year in Idaho.

    "Drivers must recognize what aggressive driving is, understand the risk involved, and know they will be ticketed if they choose to drive aggressively," explained Cecilia Arritola, with ITD's Office of Highway Operations and Safety.

    "Aggressive driving is a serious problem in Idaho," Arritola said, "particularly in rural areas where higher speed limits are usually in place and more than two-thirds of fatal aggressive driving crashes occur."

    Aggressive driving behaviors like speeding and following too closely also contribute to crashes that take place in and around highway and road construction areas.