Medal of Honor Recipients

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In recognition for extraordinary acts of valor and heroism, the Idaho Law Enforcement, Firefighting and EMS Medal of Honor is awarded to law enforcement officers, firefighters and EMTs who have been distinguished by exceptionally meritorious conduct, assuring that the sacrifices of these professionals are recognized and their bravery honored by the state whose citizens they protect.

 

MedalOfHonorRecipient.jpgMark Stall - On September 20, 1997, at approximately 1:20 a.m., Boise Police Officer Mark Stall and his partner, Officer Rob Berrier, responded to a call to assist at a traffic stop in the parking lot of a Bar in downtown Boise. The two suspects in the stopped automobile, defied nearly every command given to them by Boise Police officers Bryan Hagler and Stephen Van Doren. With Officers Dale Rogers, Ron Winegar, Gary Wiggins, Mark Stall, and Rob Berrier present, one suspect was commanded three times to raise his jacket and turn around. Each time, he responded, "I don't think so!" Sweeping his jacket back, he drew a gun from a holster on his hip and began shooting at the officers, hitting Officer Winegar. A gun battle ensued. One suspect emerged form the passenger door of the automobile and opened fire, fatally wounding Officer Stall. Despite his wounds, Officer Stall refused to surrender his weapon while the threat remained. As Officer Berrier pulled him to safety, Officer Stall reached around him and fired at the suspect in an effort to protect his partner and help bring the violence to an end. Officer Stall's indomitable spirit, resolute courage, and profound concern for his fellow officers, without regard for his own life, above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the Boise Police Department and of Idaho law enforcement and reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and all Idaho law enforcement officers.  (Learn more about Mark Stall here)

Robert Berrier - On September 20, 1997, at approximately 1:20 a.m., Boise Police Officer Rob Berrier and his partner, Officer Mark Stall, responded to a call to assist at a traffic stop in the parking lot of a Bar in downtown Boise. The two men in the stopped automobile, defied nearly every command given to them by Boise Police officers Bryan Hagler and Stephen Van Doren. With Officers Dale Rogers, Ron Winegar, Gary Wiggins, Mark Stall, and Rob Berrier present, the suspect was commanded three times to raise his jacket and turn around. Each time, he responded, "I don't think so!" Sweeping his jacket back, he drew a gun from a holster on his hip and began shooting at the officers, hitting Officer Winegar. A gun battle ensued. A suspect emerged form the passenger door of the automobile and opened fire, fatally wounding Officer Stall. Officer Berrier ran to Officer Stall's side. As he reached for him, a bullet ricocheted off the pavement. Looking to his left, Officer Berrier locked eyes with the wounded suspect, who was shooting at them. Officer Berrier turned his back on the shooter in an effort to pull Officer Stall to safety. Officer Berrier's indomitable courage in the face of danger and his profound concern for his fellow officers without regard for his own life, above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the Boise Police Department and of Idaho law enforcement and reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and all Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient (2).jpgBryan Hagler - On September 20, 1997, at approximately 1:20 a.m., Boise Police Officer Bryan Hagler and his partner, Officer Stephen Van Doren, initiated a traffic stop in the parking lot of a Bar in downtown Boise. The two men in the stopped automobile, displayed belligerent and aggressive behavior as they repeatedly defied Officer Hagler's commands. Officer Hagler remained polite and controlled. With Officers Dale Rogers, Ron Winegar, Gary Wiggins, Mark Stall, and Rob Berrier present, one suspect was commanded three times to raise his jacket and turn around. Each time, he responded, "I don't think so!" Sweeping his jacket back, he drew a gun from a holster on his hip and began shooting at the officers, hitting Officer Winegar. A gun battle ensued. the second emerged form the passenger door of the automobile and opened fire, fatally wounding Officer Stall. Officer Hagler refused to retreat under heavy fire, even though he had suffered a serious gunshot wound during a traffic stop five months earlier. Knowing Officer Winegar had been shot, Officer Hagler left cover to approach him in order to provide protection and support. He played a vital role in returning fire and helping to end the threat to his fellow officers. Officer Hagler's indomitable courage in the face of danger and his profound concern for his fellow officers without regard for his own life, above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the Boise Police Department and of Idaho law enforcement and reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and all Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient (4).jpgSteven Van Doren - On September 20, 1997, at approximately 1:20 a.m., Boise Police Officer Stephen Van Doren and his partner, Bryan Hagler, initiated a traffic stop in the parking lot of the Rider's Bar in downtown Boise. The two men in the stopped automobile, displayed belligerent and aggressive behavior as they repeatedly defied Officer Hagler's commands. With Officers Dale Rogers, Ron Winegar, Gary Wiggins, Mark Stall, and Rob Berrier present, the suspect was commanded three times to raise his jacket and turn around. Each time, he responded, "I don't think so!" Sweeping his jacket back, he drew a gun from a holster on his hip and began shooting at the officers, hitting Officer Winegar. A gun battle ensued. A second suspect emerged from the passenger door of the automobile and opened fire, fatally wounding Officer Stall. Officer Van Doren played a vital role in helping to end the threat by holding his ground in the worst of circumstances. Believing Officer Rogers was pinned down by the suspects gun fire, Officer Van Doren stepped from behind cover in order to return fire and provide protection for Officer Rogers. Officer Van Doren's selfless act of heroism and indomitable courage in the face of danger and his profound concern for his fellow officers without regard for his own life, above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the Boise Police Department and of Idaho law enforcement and reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and all Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient (5).jpgGary Wiggins - On September 20, 1997, at approximately 1:20 a.m., Boise Police Officer Gary Wiggins responded to a call to assist at a traffic stop in the parking lot of a Bar in downtown Boise. The two men in the stopped automobile, displayed belligerent and aggressive behavior as they repeatedly defied Officer Hagler's commands. With Officers Dale Rogers, Ron Winegar, Gary Wiggins, Mark Stall, and Rob Berrier present, one suspect was commanded three times to raise his jacket and turn around. Each time, he responded, "I don't think so!" Sweeping his jacket back, he drew a gun from a holster on his hip and began shooting at the officers, hitting Officer Winegar. A gun battle ensued. A second suspect emerged form the passenger door of the automobile and opened fire, fatally wounding Officer Stall. Refusing to retreat under heavy fire Officer Wiggins played a vital role in bringing the threat to an end. Officer Wiggins held his ground and continued to fight under the worst of circumstances until the threat was neutralized. Officer Wiggins' resolute spirit and extraordinary courage in the face of danger and his profound concern for his fellow officers without regard for his own life, above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the Boise Police Department and of Idaho law enforcement and reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and all Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient (6).jpgRon Winegar - On September 20, 1997, at approximately 1:20 a.m., Boise Police Officer Ron Winegar responded to a call to assist at a traffic stop in the parking lot of a Bar in downtown Boise. The two men in the stopped automobile, displayed belligerent and aggressive behavior as they repeatedly defied Officer Hagler's commands. With Officers Dale Rogers, Ron Winegar, Gary Wiggins, Mark Stall, and Rob Berrier present, the suspect was commanded three times to raise his jacket and turn around. Each time, he responded, "I don't think so!" Sweeping his jacket back, he drew a gun from a holster on his hip and began shooting at the officers, hitting Officer Winegar. A gun battle ensued. A second suspect emerged form the passenger door of the automobile and opened fire, fatally wounding Officer Stall. Despite his severe wounds, Officer Winegar continued to focus on the fight as he kept cover on one of the suspects in an effort to protect his fellow officers. Officers Winegar's exemplary spirit of selflessness, extraordinary courage in the face of danger and his profound concern for his fellow officers without regard for his own life, above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the Boise Police Department and of Idaho law enforcement and reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and all Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient (1).jpgDale Rogers - On September 20, 1997, Boise Police Officers stopped brothers Craig and Doug Brodrick for a traffic violation. Because the suspects were acting suspiciously, the officers decided to conduct a "high risk" stop. Corporal Dale Rogers was one of several officers who heard the call for assistance and arrived at the scene. The driver of the suspect vehicle was directed to exit the vehicle, lift his coat, and turn around. The driver told officers, "I don't think so" and "No." Corporal Rogers had his weapon aimed at the driver for cover. The driver was directed two more times to lift his coat and turn around. The driver gave the same response and began stepping backwards. As he stepped back he brushed his coat aside, revealing a gun holster. The suspect reached for the holster and Corporal Rogers responded, firing two rounds. The driver moved to the front of the vehicle and exchanged gunfire with the officers. Corporal Rogers advanced and took a position directly behind the suspects vehicle, where he could monitor the passenger side of the vehicle. The passenger exited the vehicle with a gun in his hand, firing rounds. As the passenger fired shots at other officers, Corporal Rogers fired his weapon at the passenger killing him and ending the threat to his fellow officers. He then observed the driver running toward him and continuing to fire his weapon. Corporal Rogers fired three rounds at the driver causing him to fall to the ground. The driver then lifted his head and attempted to reach for his gun again. Corporal Rogers fired one more round at the driver, killing him and ending the gun battle. During the exchange of gunfire between law enforcement officers and the suspects, two officers where struck by suspect fire; one was mortally wounded. Corporal Rogers courageously and calmly continued to engage both suspects until the threat ceased. His actions undoubtedly brought this deadly encounter to an end, thus preventing further injury or loss of life. Corporal Roger's extraordinary heroism and intrepidity, at the risk of his own life above and beyond the call of duty, reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and all Idaho law enforcement officers. 

MedalOfHonorRecipient (3).jpgMichael Charles - On November 14, 2002, a suspect from Homedale led officers from several law enforcement agencies on a high speed pursuit, which began in western Canyon County and ended in downtown Boise. The suspect was driving a stolen pickup truck and was in possession of an SKS assault rifle. During this pursuit the suspect swerved toward officers who were attempting to deploy stop sticks, fired shots at pursuing officers, and struck a police vehicle and two other vehicles occupied by innocent citizens. When the truck the suspect was driving came to a rest near the intersection of Broadway and Myrtle, the man exited the vehicle, assault rifle in hand, and began firing at officers. Boise Police Officer Mike Charles drove his patrol vehicle close to the suspect in an attempt to block him in. Upon observing the suspect taking aim at officers, Officer Charles exited his vehicle and took cover. As gunfire was exchanged between the man and officers on the scene, Officer Charles moved in closer to the suspect and fired two rounds, causing him to fall to the ground. Without regard for his own safety, Officer Charles left his position of cover and fired three more rounds at the suspect, killing him and bringing this incident to an end without further loss of life or injury to his fellow officers or citizens. Officer Charles' extraordinary heroism and intrepidity, at the risk of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and all Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient-- (1).jpgBrek Orton - On August 7, 2007, Boise Police Officer Brek Orton responded to a call for a water rescue on the Boise River. Upon arrival, Officer Orton observed three Boise firefighters on a log in the river trying to cut a trapped woman's bathing suit free from the limbs of a downed tree. Her body had been completely submerged under eight to ten inches of water for approximately ten minutes. Officer Orton jumped into the swift current and made his way to the body. Unable to touch bottom himself, Officer Orton held onto the log with one arm as he pushed the body upstream against the strong current. The firefighters were ready and able to immediately cut the bathing suit free from the branch. Officer Orton kept hold of the victim as they were swept downstream where he was able to pull her towards the shore. Officer Orton's exceptionally brave and selfless actions allowed firefighters and EMS to begin resuscitation efforts, which resulted in the saving of the victims life. His actions are in the highest tradition of Idaho law enforcement and are a credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient-- (2).jpgChris Davis - On August 5, 2008, Boise Police Officer Chris Davis responded to a Code Three call to "assist fire". Officer Davis observed the fire, propelled by 50 mile per hour winds, racing toward the Oregon Trail Heights Subdivision in Boise, Idaho. Officer Davis drove to the threatened subdivision, where he joined Boise Police Officer Jason Rose. Breathing thick, black smoke, Officers Davis and Rose ran from door to door, evacuating residents form their homes. At one point, flames shot over a house as a huge wave and between houses like a blowtorch, aimed directly at Officer Davis. Officer Davis ran for his life as the flames blew around him, melting the shirt on his back. After extinguishing his clothing, Officer Davis pressed on through the flames and chaos. Forty foot walls of flame continued to force the officers to dive for cover. Propane tanks and water heaters exploded around them. Houses were burning as the officers entered home after home to make sure residents were safely evacuated. Despite the increasing danger, officers Davis and Rose remained committed to evacuating the residents, ultimately causing the officers to become trapped in a cul-de-sac by a 100 foot wave of swirling flames. officer Rose drove his patrol car through the barrier, allowing them to escape with their lives. Through indomitable courage, complete disregard for his won safety, and profound concern for the residents of the Oregon Trail Heights Subdivision, Officer Davis' extraordinary heroism and resolute courage, fortitude and endurance at grate danger to his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in the highest tradition of Idaho law enforcement and are a credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient-- (3).jpgJason Rose - On August 5, 2008 Boise Police Officer Jason Rose responded to a Code Three call to "assist fire". Officer Rose observed the fire propelled by 50 mph winds racing towards the Oregon Trail Heights Subdivision. Officer Rose drove to the threatened subdivision where he was joined by Boise Police Officer Chris Davis. Breathing thick, black, toxic smoke, Officer Rose and Davis ran from door to door evacuating residents from their homes. After clearing one such home, Officer Rose was leaving the residence when he felt as if "he had been hit in the back with a sledgehammer." He flew off the porch and was thrown facedown onto the ground as the house behind him exploded. Knowing he had almost been killed, Officer Rose picked himself up and pressed on through the flames and chaos. On numerous occasions, forty foot walls of flame forced the officers to dive for cover. Propane tanks and water heaters exploded around them, shooting high into the air. Houses were burning as the officers entered home after home to make sure the residents were safely evacuated. Officers Rose and Davis remained committed to evacuating the residents without regard for their own lives, causing them to become trapped in a cul-de-sac by a 100 foot wave of swirling flames. Officer Rose drove his patrol car through a barrier, allowing them to escape with their lives. Officer Rose's selfless and heroic efforts averted the probable loss of many lives.

MedalOfHonorRecipient-- (5).jpgScott Mulcahy - On June 24, 1996, Boise Police Officers Scott Mulcahy and Clay Christensen responded to a call regarding a male subject on a bike who was selling marijuana.  Unbeknownst to them, the subject was a convicted felon and a documented, violent gang member who had escaped from a Nevada prison work camp. As the officers approached the subject, he attempted to flee on his bike. Officer Mulcahy pushed the suspect to the ground, at which time the suspect reached for a gun at his side. An intense fight for the gun ensued as Officers Mulcahy and Christensen fought for their lives. A gun battle followed. Surviving both fights, the suspect ran, stopping only to fire more shots at the officers. Officer Mulcahy gave chase on foot. The suspect carjacked a vehicle at gunpoint and drove off. Officer Mulcahy continued the pursuit on foot until Officer Christensen drove up and stopped long enough for Officer Mulcahy to jump in their patrol car. Together they continued the pursuit and soon found the stolen vehicle crashed into a light post several blocks away. They saw the suspect chasing a security guard and shooting at him. The suspect again turned his gun on the officers and fired. Officer Christensen returned fire, hitting the suspect twice. Officers Mulcahy and Christensen again advanced on foot in pursuit of the suspect. Finally spotting him in a parking lot, they commanded him to drop his gun. After reloading, the suspect turned toward the officers, at which time Officer Christensen fired two shots, ending the threat to the public and themselves. With complete disregard for his own safety and profound concern for the lives of the citizens and Officer Christensen, Officer Mulcahy refused to retreat under continued fire, instead choosing to relentlessly pursue the dangerous suspect. Officer Mulcahy's extraordinary heroism and resolute courage, fortitude and endurance at grave danger to his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in the highest traditions of the Boise Police Department and of Idaho law enforcement officers and reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient-- (4).jpgClay Christensen - On June 24, 1996, Boise Police Officers Clay Christensen and Scott Mulcahy responded to a call regarding a male subject on a bike who was selling marijuana. Unbeknownst to them, the subject was a convicted felon and a violent, documented gang member from Nevada who had escaped from a prison work camp. As the officers approached the subject, he attempted to flee on his bike. Officer Mulcahy pushed the suspect to the ground, at which time the suspect reached for a gun at his side. An intense fight for the gun ensued as Officers Christensen and Mulcahy fought for their lives. A gun battle followed. Surviving both fights, the suspect ran, stopping only to fire more shots at the officers. Officer Mulcahy gave chase on foot. The suspect carjacked a vehicle at gunpoint and drove off. Officer Christensen grabbed his AR-15 and drove after the suspect, stopping long enough for Officer Mulcahy to jump in their patrol car. Together they continued their pursuit and soon found the stolen vehicle crashed into a light post several blocks away. They saw the suspect chasing a security guard and shooting at him. The suspect again turned his gun on the officers and fired. Officer Christensen returned fire, hitting the suspect twice. Officers Christensen and Mulcahy again advanced on foot in pursuit of the suspect. Finally spotting him in a parking lot, they commanded him to drop his gun. After reloading, the suspect turned towards the officers, at which time Officer Christensen fired two shots, ending the threat to the public and themselves. With complete disregard for his own safety and profound concern for the lives of the citizens and Officer Mulcahy, Officer Christensen refused to retreat under continued fire, instead choosing to relentlessly pursue the dangerous suspect. Officer Christensen's extraordinary heroism and resolute courage, fortitude and endurance at grave danger to his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in the highest traditions of the Boise Police Department and of Idaho law enforcement officers and reflect great credit upon himself, the Boise Police Department and Idaho law enforcement officers.

MedalOfHonorRecipient--.jpgVernon Bisterfeldt - On January 29, 1969, Vernon Bisterfeldt assisted in capturing a man who had held his family hostage and managed to escape from officers at the scene. When the man was subsequently located he fired at officers with a rifle. Sgt. Bisterfedt, disregarding the threat to his own life, returned fire and neutralized the suspect, removing the threat to other officers' lives. These actions were performed in accordance with the highest traditions of public service.